Sullivans

The destroyer USS The Sullivans was named for five brothers from Waterloo, Iowa – George, Francis, Joseph, Madison, and Albert Sullivan – who had enlisted in the Navy and served together during World War 2.

In 1942, the cruiser was sunk by a torpedo from a Japanese submarine, killing most of the sailors on board. George Sullivan survived, only to succumb soon afterward.

Decommissioned in 1965, The Sullivans was designated a National Historic Landmark. Shortly afterwards, the stories of ghosts began to emerge.

Workers, guards, and tour guides began to report strange incidents that seemed to come to a head around November the 13th – the very day the Sullivan brothers’ ship was torpedoed was on November 13, 1942.

The most interesting phenomenon reported aboard The Sullivans concerns a room (Area 43) designated “Sullivan Bros. Memorial” with framed photographs of each of the five brothers. Whenever someone takes a snapshot of the row of pictures, four of them appear normal while that of George is indistinct – looking like “a big blur of light.”

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